Posts Tagged “STEM”

Satisfy Your Curiosity With Curious George

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As Ambassadors for the day, Mark and Victoria were invited for a complementary blogging tour of the Liberty Science Center. Admission tickets are in exchange of this honest review where all ideas and opinions expressed are strictly that of myself, Mark and Victoria. #Sponsored

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A key to enhancing your child’s learning experience is to tap into their natural curiosities.  So naturally we were very excited when the opportunity arose to check out the new Curious George exhibit at Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, NJ. It was a hike for us South Jersey folks but well worth it. Victoria and Mark had the opportunity to explore the exhibit as part of a special bloggers event, and we’re here to give you the inside scoop.

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Curious George: Let’s Get Curious! is on display now through January 8th, 2017 with plenty for our youngest explorers to discover. Children are encouraged to get curious and hands-on. The exhibit is, in part, retrospective of Curious George’s career with artifacts from his classic tv show and stories. Curious George as an astronaut, farmer, and construction worker… taking you back yet? The showcase features snippets of his greatest adventures. Like Barbie, he’s done a little of everything.

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There are several interactive and super creative areas like this rocket-ship below. This was probably one of the most popular attractions with spiral stairs. As was the Farmer’s Market with a register, aprons and the full feel of running a market/store.

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Toward the back of display, the writer’s story comes to life with an old time office and memorabilia. Victoria was obsessed with the phone and office set up. She returned at least three times to this display and was completely wrapped up in her own world of imaginative play.

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Another family favorite was the Barn – equipped with a crafting area and a wind sock (how cute). Victoria made a pin wheel. And again the imagination kicked in with her playtime. The exhibit was beautifully decorated with murals from scenes of the books along the walls including a bakery, city, farms and a park. It really came to life with extras like park benches, balloon trees and Curious George for pictures. The construction zone was impressive with a two-story crank taking foam blocks to the top level.

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Mark was really impressed with the mini golf arrangement with 3 little holes interactive with cranks and ramps. He felt it was “a very creative use of PVC piping as tunnels”. He was equally taken back with the apartment scene whereas Curious George was hanging onto a rope to clean the windows… another famous scene from his stories. The front of the building had wheels and pulleys with ropes to pull George up and down to clean the apartment windows. The whole exhibit had quite a lot to take in, including the lobby with a doorman dress up station, mail cabinets and an interactive elevator.

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Young visitors are invited “to let curiosity and inquiry be their guides as they explore familiar buildings and locales from the “Curious George” books and television series on PBS KIDS. The exhibit presents key concepts in science, math and engineering, which are woven throughout the exhibit.” – LSC Press Release Sept 2016

The Liberty Science Center did an amazing job incorporating a childhood and family favorite classic: Curious George (and the Man with the Yellow Hat) into a fully engaging exhibit promoting the experiment of weight, size & sorting, engineering concepts,  light & shadow, physics, creativity, and wind power. A beautiful blend of exploration and nostalgia.

Wanna Visit? Win a Family Four Pack of Tickets

We are excited to announce a giveaway for one lucky family, winning a four-pack of tickets to the Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, NJ. Admission to Curious George: Let’s Get Curious Exhibit is included in general admission. This prize pack is worth up to $87. Click on the Rafflecopter Giveaway below to enter the contest.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

The Liberty Science Center has far more than this “museum within a museum”. Be sure to check out all of their programs – something for everyone ages 0-99. We are greatly looking forward to sharing additional articles highlighting some of their other permanent exhibits. So definitely stay tuned.

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Philadelphia Science Festival with a Little Something Science for Everyone

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It’s time to get your geek on…

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Philadelphia Science Festival is April 24th through May 2nd 2015 and holds so many amazing family activities. Festivities include events for educators, families and even adult only educational entertainment (careful though as they sell out quick quick).

 

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In 2013, we attended the Philadelphia Science Festival Carnival – which is hosted Saturday, May 2nd this year. Below you’ll find some of our favorite moments. Tent after tent… there were activities for all ages: messy stations, starry ones and lots of engineering and puzzle solving. We are so excited to return this year.

 

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This year we took our geeky-selves to Rowan University in partnership with the Philadelphia Science Festival. Several departments had family exhibits… of course the messy and colorful ones were Victoria’s favorite. Check out the highlights below and definitely consider a trip out to Rowan University next year for early festival festivities.

 

Philadelphia Science Festival

Philadelphia Science Festival

Philadelphia Science Festival

Philadelphia Science Festival

And Hey, we were not compensated for this post. All the content and opinions herein are strictly mine and my family’s. We had a great time exploring the Philadelphia Science Festival and look forward to the remaining events this week include that awesome Carnival coming up on Saturday.

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Lego, Mega Bloks, K’Nex & GoldieBlox

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A Construction Christmas Wishlist… by Greg Wolbert

Ho ho ho, Christmas is on the way and with that come wish-lists and letters to Santa. This year, one of the most sought out toys are creation toys such as Lego, Mega Blocks, Goldieblocks, and K’nex. These toys allow children to enhance their critical thinking and creativity.

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Lego was founded in 1932 and has since become the largest block building manufactures in the world. Lego has manufactured over four thousand sets, all of them ranging from stand alone boxes to blockbuster movie recreations. Lego has even created to scale models of the worlds most magnificent wonders. Examples of their finest sets include Harry Potter, Star Wars, and Disney Princess series, as well as the White House, Taj Mahal, and the Big Ben bell tower. Lego sets can all be combined to allow an unlimited amount of re-usability and creativity.

 

Mega Brands/Bloks is one of the most direct competitors of Lego. Mega Bloks, while they have a very similar brick building system as Lego, have more detailed accessories within their play sets. Their mini figures have articulated joints for a wider range of poses and movement. However, they don’t have the same interchangeability as the Lego mini figures. Mega Bloks has a variety of play sets and series such as the every popular Barbie and Hot Wheels. They also have building sets around Hello Kitty, Skylanders, Sponge Bob and Power Rangers.

 

A relatively new toy is Goldieblox. Goldieblox is a girl focused creation building play set. Goldieblox are designed to inspire girls to become builders and engineers. There are a number of sets from zip lines to cars to spinning machines, and each set contains a set of challenges for the girls to complete using only a set number of pieces contained in the set. These sets help shape young girls critical thinking skills. Watch Victoria’s video review below from a sample sent from #SweetSuite14 of Blogger Bash NYC.

 

K’nex are a free flowing building series that use rods, orbs, and magnets to construct imaginative works. This is an award winning intricate construction building system, established in 1992. K’nex come in a variety of box sets, featuring different characters and/or functions (Super Mario, Angry Birds, roll-coasters, raceway, etc). In distinct fashion, K’nex building play sets offer flexibility in creation and design allowing unlimited engineering and innovation during play time.

 

Children, both boys and girls enjoy the satisfaction of creating play sets, especially those partnered with favorite characters such as SpongeBob or Barbie. Any of the above brands would make excellent educational toys for this holiday season.

 

We’d love to hear which building sets are your favorite; leave us a comment below. Send us a picture of your son or daughter’s creation at Barbara@HomeroomAtHome.com and we’ll select a few to be featured on our Facebook page.

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You Be The Chemist Challenge 2013

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Last year Homeroom At Home had the pleasure of attending the National You Be The Chemist Challenge held at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia, where we met some of the contestants and their families. Here’s a look back at last year’s You Be The Chemist Challenge.

As this year’s National YBTC Challenge approaches (June 24th), we are excited to learn more about the program, competition and education efforts of the Chemical Educational Foundation. While the national competition holds a lot of excitement, especially since we’re coming right up on the date – the excitement isn’t just getting started, but in fact, students across the US have been enjoying this chemistry program’s fun for months.

So what’s the program if it’s not just competition?

The Chemical Educational Foundation established the You Be The Chemist program as a creative way for educators [note: I include parents in this category] to present and teach concepts of chemistry and science to students in a way that they will not only understand but truly get excited about. The YBTC program consists of the YBTC Challenge (competition), YBTC Activity Guide for educators/parents and YBTC Essential Elements, a hands-on workshop to help teachers enhance classroom experience in using the YBTC program materials.

The Chemical Educational Foundation’s mission in creating the entire You Be The Chemist program was “designed to enhance K-8 science education by introducing the science of chemistry as it relates to our everyday lives and to the study of other sciences” with goals as follows according to www.chemed.org/media:

  • Enhance science education through innovative techniques, such as hands-on activities and chemistry competitions

  • Inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers, and chemical industry leaders

  • Effect long-term change in the general public’s understanding of, participation in, and general acceptance towards chemistry and the chemical industry

  • Provide opportunities for collaborative initiatives between chemical industry members and the communities in which they operate

The You Be The Chemist (YBTC) Challenge engages children in grades 5th through 8th in a peer-based “interactive academic competition in learning important chemistry concepts, scientific discoveries, and laboratory safety.” An excerpt from https://www.chemed.org/ybtc/challenge/home states that the Challenge offers the following benefits:

  • Introduces students to the central role of chemistry in all of the sciences and in their everyday lives.

  • Uses the drama of competition to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education.

  • Provides educators with an exciting way to educate their students and assess their learning.

  • Encourages parents to participate in their child’s education.

  • Allows industry members to connect with their community and actively show their support for science education.

Sounds like fun – how do you get started?

The Chemical Educational Foundation makes it easy to get connected with an existing YBTC group or to start your own. Click here to find out more information. Note, however, that schools aren’t the only place that groups are formed, but local science clubs or the Boy Scouts are examples of other groups that have taken advantage of this opportunity. Make sure you read the guidelines for competition rules and such. Resources are available by clicking here for the study materials.

What is the incentive for making it to the National competition?

The upcoming National YBTC Challenge will be held again at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia. This is an exciting time for the students who’ve won their regional and state challenges and are preparing for this final round. But it is so much more than that… more than a competition on several levels. The students that are participating in the national competition have the opportunity to meet with chemical industry leaders, educators and businessmen and women. They have the opportunity to visit with local science attractions and celebrate their accomplishments in a welcome dinner and a celebration dinner both held at local science museums. The package is an amazing opportunity for those who’ve earned a place at the national competition level – oh yeah – and there are participant prizes!


And what if competitions aren’t our thing or my children aren’t old enough for the YBTC Challenge?

Parents, you can download the material and activity guides (grades K-4 or 5-8) for your own family science fun. Perhaps with a couple of cousins or neighbors – select a few simple projects for the kids to enjoy and learn together. The materials are comprehensive, making the lesson easy with everyday household items and enjoyable for grown-ups and students alike. The educator’s Activity Guide is an excellent resource for weekend or summertime learning fun. I particularly appreciate the section on “Tips for teaching Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)” as the tips are just as applicable for parents wanting to engage their children in such topics, as well as teachers. Parents, you hold a tremendous amount of influence when it comes to educating your children – I encourage you to tap into that power and see where your collective interests and efforts take you.

In addition, The CEF site offers “Newton & Kelvin’s Laboratory” with interactive web activities, games and online flashcards for the Periodic Table.

Resources for this post include the variety of materials provided by the Chemical Educational Foundation website. This is a non-sponsored post, whereas I was not compensated. All the opinions expressed herein are strictly mine.

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